Homemade Pasta w/ Springtime Asparagus & Ham

When I told my son that we were going to try to make our own spaghetti he got super excited!  We already make pizza dough, cookies, cupcakes together – so he is going to know how to bake – but homemade pasta is something amazing. 

I used to wonder why would anyone make their own pasta?  You can easily buy it at the store….  I love trying to figure out how we can save money by having fun making things at home, I just didn’t know if homemade pasta was really even worth it. 

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My son’s little helping hand

It is.  Pasta that you make yourself is “sublime.”  It’s hard to even describe how differently it tasted, the pasta had flavor!  It actually absorbed the salt from the boiling water that it cooked in – it actually tasted like “egg noodles.”

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He loved making the “Volcano!”

 

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The dough hydrates for 1 hour

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Should feel thin & satiny

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It is super easy to make pasta yourself – you don’t even need to buy a pasta machine to roll & flatten your noodles, you can use an old-fashioned rolling-pin.  Even using my rolling-pin, it was still incredibly easy to get it to the desired texture and thinness.

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Most Delicious Noodles Ever!

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Ready for Springtime Greens!

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So here is the low-down on what I did, the videos I picked to watch on youtube, and some tips from an AMAZING cookbook on the basics of understanding pasta making (and ingredients) from an Italian-ethnic perspective.

Things you’ll need:

  • Rolling pin or Pasta Machine (you really do need one of these, otherwise the dough won’t get that satiny texture)
  • Large pot
  • 2 cups Flour (you can use All-Purpose or use other non-gluten mixes & flours *see bottom of post)
  • 3 eggs
  • Sea Salt or Kosher salt for the water

I used a combination of my Joy of Cooking instructions & the youtube videos below:

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*Note: I didn’t include the oil or salt into the pasta, it still tasted incredible.

A video of a chef (good for beginners & shows also how to use a pasta machine)

A video of a woman showing her method & how to use a rolling pin to make the pasta

Tips from Pasta the Italian Way: Sauces & Shapes:

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  • Kosher salt is the closest thing to Italy’s sale grosso, Italian coarse salt.  You should salt the boiling water so that it is very salty – tasting like sea water.
  • Italian women really were not particular about ingredients in their pasta flour – don’t be afraid to try different nut flours if you need gluten-free.  The mountains and hills of Liguria were covered in chestnuts and even today they still use chestnut flour in their breads & pasta.
  • Although Italy is known for Polenta (from cornmeal), it is also Italian to use corn flour in pasta, which is another great gluten-free alternative.
  • Don’t obsess over the methods and quantity of ingredients, watch the videos and use your own intuition as to how the pasta feels to decide what’s working or not.
  • Do obsess over quality ingredients, skip an ingredient rather than add a poor imitation

Have fun making your own pasta!  I’ll have another post more than likely on making Spinach or Kale pasta, which gives it a beautiful green color and supposedly a great flavor… I believe it!  ❤

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3 thoughts on “Homemade Pasta w/ Springtime Asparagus & Ham

  1. Pingback: Sneaky Mommy (St. Patrick’s Day Pasta) | girlwithadragonflytattoo

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