The Elegant Woman

Another word for “graceful” is “elegant.”  I’ve always loved that word, and how much more intriguing it would be to embody such a description.  When I think of graceful I think of someone who extends grace to those around her, who accepts people and genuinely loves them for who they are. 

C.S. Lewis wrote about such an elegant woman in The Great Divorce,

 
“I cannot now remember whether she was naked or clothed. If she were naked, then it must have been the almost visible penumbra of her courtesy and joy which produces in my memory the illusion of a great and shining train that followed her across the happy grass. If she were clothed, then the illusion of nakedness is doubtless due to the clarity with which her inmost spirit shone through the clothes. For clothes in that country are not a disguise: the spiritual body lives along each thread and turns them into living organs. A robe or a crown is there as much one of the wearer’s features as a lip or an eye.

But I have forgotten. And only partly do I remember the unbearable beauty of her face.

“Is it?…is it?” I whispered to my guide.
“Not at all,” said he. “It’s someone ye’ll never have heard of. Her name on earth was Sarah Smith and she lived at Golders Green.”
“She seems to be…well, a person of particular importance?”
“Aye. She is one of the great ones. Ye have heard that fame in this country and fame on Earth are two quite different things.”
… “And who are all these young men and women on each side?”
“They are her sons and daughters.”
“She must have had a very large family, Sir.”
Every young man or boy that met her became her son – even if it was only the boy that brought the meat to her back door. Every girl that met her was her daughter.”
“Isn’t that a bit hard on their own parents?”
“No. There are those that steal other people’s children. But her motherhood was of a different kind. Those on whom it fell went back to their natural parents loving them more. Few men looked on her without becoming, in a certain fashion, her lovers. But it was the kind of love that made them not less true, but truer, to their own wives.”
 
C.S. Lewis, The Great Divorce

 

An elegant woman builds people up, especially her significant other or husband, but everyone who happens upon her path in life – she takes time to encounter them, to embrace them with her very essence

She is patient with people who would normally try others’ patience, she extends her friendship freely and nondiscriminantly. 

She does not play favorites based on looks or popularity, but holds those close who she can see into their heart and tell that they are good

She’s sees good in others even when (or rather especially when) they aren’t able to see it themselves – she believes in them.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s